Lesson 7 "和製英語ですよ" That's actually a Japanese-English word!


Grammar Focus 1 : "和製英語(wasei eigo)"

Japanese-English or Japanglish words

There are so many and the list is endless, but here is some examples of 和製英語(わせいえいご), Japanese-English, Japanglish, Japanese-made English words, or made-in-Japan English words.
和製英語(wasei eigo)

How Japanese people think

it is spelled.

English

フライドポテト

(huraido poteto)

Fried potato French Fries / chips

シュークリーム

(shū kurīmu)

shoe creme

("chou à la crème"

in French)

cream puff

ノートパソコン

(nōto pasokon)

note persocon?

note personal computer

lap-top computer

キーホルダー

(kī horudā)

key holder

key folder

key chain, key ring

シャーペン

(shāpen)

sharp pencil mechanical pencil

パン

(pan)

pan

("pão" in Portuguese)

bread

ホチキス

(hochikisu)

hochkiss?

(trade name "Hotchkiss")

stapler

レントゲン

(rentogen)

rentgen/lentgen

("Röntgen" in German)

x-ray

ペットボトル

(petto botoru)

PET bottle

(polyethylene terephthalate)

plastic bottle

サラリーマン

(sararīman)

salaryman

corporate employee

ピアス

(piasu)

pierce

earrings that

need piercing holes

マンション

(manshon)

mansion apartment

アルバイト

(arubaito) 

arbait/albait?

("Arbeit" in German)

 part-time job

コンセント

(konsento)

consent

outlet/socket

スキンシップ

(sukinshippu)

skinship physical contact

パーカー

(pākā)

paka/parker/parkar ? hoodie

クレーム

(kurēmu)

claim complaint

ガソリンスタンド

(gasorin sutando)

gasoline stand

gas station

petrol station

CA/キャビンアテンダント

(shīē/kyabin atendanto)

CA/cabin attendant flight attendant

ドライヤー

(doraiyā)

dryer hair dryer

ビーチサンダル

(bīchi sandaru)

beach sandal flip-flops

リモコン

(rimokon)

rimocon/rimokon? remote controller

ナイーブ

(naību)

naive sensitive, pure

マフラー

(mahurā)

muffler scarf

ジェットコースター

(jetto kōsutā)

jet coaster roller coaster

フロント

(huronto)

front reception desk

モーニングコール

(mōningu kōru)

morning call wake-up call

ゲージ

(gēji)

gage/gauge cage (for pets)

ネームバリュー

(nēmu baryū)

name value

publicity

name recognition

コインランドリー

(koin randorī)

coin laundry launderette

リベンジする

(ribenji suru)

revenge to try again

メルヘンチック

(meruhenchikku)

melhentic?

(German "Märchen"

and English "-tic")

fairy-tale-like

ハイテンション

(hai tenshon)

high tension

hyper, overexcited

アメリカンドッグ

(amerikan doggu)

American dog

corn dog

モルモット

(morumotto)

marmot

guinea pig

リップクリーム

(rippu kurīmu)

リップスティック

(rippu suthikku)

lip cream

lipstick

lip balm

リンス

(rinsu)

rinse hair conditioner

バイク

(baiku)

bike motorcycle

オープンカー

(ōpun kā)

open car convertible (car)

スマート

(sumāto)

smart slim, slender

電子レンジ

(denshi renji)

renge microwave oven

ティッシュペーパー

(thisshu pēpā)

tissue paper Kleenex, tissue

ウェットティッシュ

(uwetto thisshu)

wet tissue wet wipes

ベビーベッド

(bebī beddo)

baby bed

crib

ベビーカー

(bebī kā)

baby car

pram, stroller,

baby carriage

ベビーシート

(bebī shīto)

baby seat infant car seat

チャイルドシート

(chairudo shīto)

child seat

car seat

child safety seat


Grammar Focus 2 : Particle "よ(yo)"

The particle “よ(yo)”  shows some emphasis. It is sometimes translated as "you know," "hey," "come on,” "actually," "as a matter of fact," "look!" etc.

eg.

    1電車が来ます
       (densha ga kimasu yo!)
        ---Look, the train is coming!
    2. それは和製英語です
       (sore wa wasei eigo desu yo.)
        ---That's actually a Japanglish.

Grammar Focus 3 : "__があります。"

"There is/are __." (talking about objects)

__があります。(__ga arimasu)

  --- There is/are + objects/events. 

  --- I/you/he/she... have + objects/events.

eg.

1. 明日テストがあります。

   (ashita tesuto ga arimasu)

  ---There will be an exam tomorrow.

 

2. Dialogue

A: Mitchさんの家にはトイレはありますか?

  (micchi san no ie ni wa toire wa arimasu ka?)

  ---Do you have a bathroom in your house?

 

B-1: はい、トイレはあります。

  (hai, toire ha arimasu.)

  ---Yes, we do. We have a bathroom.

                or 

 

B-2: いいえ、トイレはありません。

  (iie, toire wa arimasen.)

  ---No, we don't. We don't have a bathrooms.


Additional Grammar & Phrases

4. adjective+looking

eg.

    4-1 い(i) adjectives: 
        おいし → おいし+そうな---delicious-looking
        (oishi-i → oishi + souna)
    4-2 な(na) adjectives: 
        ワイルド → ワイルド+そうな---wild-looking
        (wairudo-na → wairudo + souna)

5. "Can I have one/two/three... OO, please."

eg.

__を2つください。---Give me two __, please
    (__ o hutatsu kudasai)
Japanese-origin numbers:
hitotsu (1), hutatsu (2), mittsu (3), yottsu (4), itsutsu (5),
muttsu (6), nanatsu (7), yattsu (8), kokonotsu (9), too (10)  

6. suffix "-屋(ya)" or "-屋(ya)さん"=-ria, -shop, -store

eg.

ケーキ(cake) +屋  → ケーキ屋 (cake shop) 
 kēki           + ya→ kēki   ya =cake shop


Other Words & Phrases

Lesson summery



雑談(zatsudan) Small Talk "ひらがな?カタカナ?漢字?"

 In Japanese, as you might have already noticed, we have three different types of letters ; ひらがな(hiragana), カタカナ(katakana), and 漢字(kanji). But when should we use hiragana, katakana, or kanji? So today, let's learn about the Japanese writing systems.

 First, hiragana and katakana are phonetic letters. That is, each letter, or sometimes a combination of two, represents the sound. On the other hand, kanji are Chinese characters and each one of them usually has one or several meanings and often has two to five different pronunciations.

 Since hiragana and katakana are phonetic letters, if you want to, you can write everything in either hiragana or in katakana when you write in Japanese.

 Usage of カタカナ(katakana)?

 Now, let's talk about when to use which one. The use of katakana is relatively limited, so let's start with the use of katakana first. Katakana are usually used in the following situations;

 1. to write loan words, especially words from languages other than Chinese

  eg. コンピュータ(computer), ベルリン(Berlin), キムチ(Korean pickles)

2. scientific, biological and technical terms

  eg. ヒト(human beings), ヒフ(skin), ネコ(cats) ←in scientific contexts

3. onomatopoeic expressions

  eg. ドカーン(kaboom), ニャーン(meow)

 Usage of 漢字(kanji)?

 Now let's skip ひらがな(hiragana) and talk about 漢字(kanji) second. In Japan, during the 9 years of mandatory education, school children learn approximately 2,000 Chinese characters called 漢字(kanji). When we are still in the process of learning kanji, we may write things using a lot of hiragana. However, we are advised to use as many kanji as you know because;

1- It shows you education level.

2- It makes your writing easier to read since the Japanese language doesn't use spacing in between words like English.

 eg1. わたしはあめりかしゅっしんです。←hard for the Japanese to read

 eg2. 私はアメリカ出身です。←easier for the Japanese to read

 Usage of ひらがな(hiragana)?

 The Japanese learnt how to read and write from Chinese people long time ago, approximately 1,600 years ago. But since Chinese and Japanese are grammatically completely different languages, it wasn't convenient enough for Japanese people to write Japanese by using Chinese characters alone. So that's why the Japanese invented hiragana to express certain elements of the Japanese language that cannot be express with Chinese characters.

Examples of such include

1. particles; は、が、に、を etc.

2. inflections of verbs; 食べる、食べました、食べた etc.

      (similar to English "eat-ate-eaten")

3. inflections of adjectives; 大きい、大きくない、大きかった

      (similar to German "gross, grosser, grosses, grosse, grossen...)

4. some Japanese origin words and proper nouns; やくざ(yakuza), 

etc.

 Apart from this, since ひらがな(hiragana) tend to be rounder than カタカナ(katakana) or 漢字(kanji), if you want to express "soft nuance," you may chose to use ひらがな(hiragana) even if they are normally written in カタカナ(katakana) or 漢字(kanji). You may also chose to use カタカナ(katakana) if you want to express "sharp nuance" even if they are normally written in ひらがな(hiragana) or 漢字(kanji). And if you want to show off or impress other people, you can use lots of lots of 漢字(kanji) since your 漢字 (kanji) knowledge shows your education level; the more kanji you know, the more knowledgeable you are seen as.


Useful Information:

 It is known that a good language learner is also good at immersing themselves into the language and culture that they are learning even without actually going there. And in order to do so, they often watch TV, listen to the radio, read books etc. in the target language. They often have an item or two to remind themselves of the goals and to keep their motivation going. And if the item is special, it is even more powerful for your language learning. 

 So today, I'd like to introduce you a site where you can get cute, rare, and beautiful Japanese traditional craft products. After visiting the site, if you scroll all the way down to the bottom, you will see the language option [ JP|EN]. So you can shop in English as well.

 After long and hard study of Japanese, don't forget to treat yourself with a nice gift for yourself to keep going! They can be good gifts for your friends and family, too! This is the site link↓ Check it out!


Homework: 

1. Using the grammatical structures that we practiced today,

    -please write down 5 items that you have

    -and 5 items that you don't have in your house.

2. Please create 3 sentences using the structure "There will be + (event) tomorrow." in Japanese.

3. If you are not quite familiar with the Japanese scripts, please watch the following two videos to practice 10 Katakana, Japanese phonetic scripts. 

Please turn in your homework in the comment section below↓. We will go over it during the next lesson.


以下のことを守っていただければ、どなたでもお気軽にコメントを残していただけます。

Anyone can feel free to leave a comment as long as you;

 

1. 批判はしない。

do not criticize other people or other people's comments

2. 特定の個人やグループを非難・攻撃しない。

do not defame or attack a particular person or group of people

3. 語学学習に関係ないことは書かない。

do not leave comments which have nothing to do with language-learning

4. 個人を特定できる情報(メールアドレス、住所、電話番号など)は書かない。

do not write personal information such as e-mail addresses, home addresses, or telephone numbers.


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